An App for Tracking Your Children’s Ailments

Finally. For years, Melanie and I have bemoaned the lack of an app to help parents track their children’s sicknesses over time, like heir temperatures and what medicine you gave them and when. It’s especially difficult when you’ve been up all night and you have multiple kids sick at once. And then you’ve both been giving out the meds.

It looks like Feevy is the answer.

The app lets you track a child’s temperature on a graph over time, so if you take their temperature every few hours, you can go back over all of your recent readings and see if their temperature is holding steady, trending up, or trending down at a glance. You can also add things like medications that you’ve given them and when, so you make sure not to give them too much in too short a time period, and add notes about how your child is feeling at various intervals.

It lets you sync the data with someone else as well! It’s $2 right now. iPhone and iPad only.

On Evernote’s Pricing Changes

It’s no secret that I’ve been a big Evernote fan since 2009 when I became premium user. I’ve written many times about my various workflows that have turned it into my second brain and an indispensable part of my life. Looks like that’s going to be put to the test.

Evernote has announced some big changes to its pricing structure and feature set. To sum up: The free tier will be restricted to just two devices; the plus tier will be $35 per year and the premium tier will jump from $45 per year to $70 per year.

The company has been undergoing some rough times the past few years, including ousting a couple of founders and paring down their offerings. The reality is that they probably tried to do too much, especially in areas that weren’t its core business. And so they need to start turning some of those free users into paid users, which makes sense. But the increase on those of us on the top tier is a big jump, about a 55% increase.

Given the relative stagnation of the product in the past few years, the loss of some functionality (i.e. Evernote Hello), and the uncertain future, it’s a lot to ask premium users to buy into. I could go down to Plus level, but I use some of the Premium features all the time.

On top of that is the ever-increasing number of software products and services demanding more and more subscription payments. There’s only so much money available for such things.

My current annual subscription is paid up until next March (lucky for me) so I guess I’ll wait to see if there any new features (Markdown support?) between now and then that justify the cost and if there’s more certainty about Evernote’s future.

I just know that switching to anything else is going to be a major pain because I’ve been so heavily invested in it.

Apple’s Strange Bedfellows

I find it highly ironic that as politically liberal as Apple’s corporate culture and executive team is, they find themselves being opposed by uber-liberal moonbat Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-MA, even as Apple CEO Tim Cook holds fundraisers for conservative GOP leader, Rep. Paul Ryan. Politics does make strange bedfellows.

Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren today gave a speech where she accused Amazon, Apple, and Google of attempting to “snuff out competition” by locking out smaller companies, reports Recode.

“Google, Apple and Amazon have created disruptive technologies that changed the world, and … they deserve to be highly profitable and successful,” Warren said. “But the opportunity to compete must remain open for new entrants and smaller competitors that want their chance to change the world again.”

One Year After Obergefell

SCOTUS_Marriage_Equality_2015_(Obergefell_v._Hodges)_-_26_June_2015

At the end of another disastrous Supreme Court term, one in which the judicial giant, Antonin Scalia, was lost, the Court handed down a terrible decision written by Justice Anthony Kennedy that overturned Texas’ law that put abortion clinics under the same sort of regulations that other surgical clinics have to abide by. This sets back the cause of saving live of babies yet again and puts even more women at risk of another Kermit Gosnell mass murder situation.

It’s been a year since the end of the previous Supreme Court term, in which they disastrously created a constitutional right to marry someone of the same sex and so I wanted to revisit some of my thoughts from then to show how terrible the current bench is and why it’s so important we get better justices.

"In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were." – Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing in the majority opinion of the Obergefell v. Hodges ruling that legalized same-sex marriage.

Yes, that's called "children". The whole point of the State protecting and promoting marriage was to protect and promote children, which are vital to the continuation of the State. But ever since we legalized contraception, divorce, and abortion, we've eroded the reason and meaning of civil marriage. So now we come to this: Marriage now exists to magnify the most important thing of all: The All-Glorious Me! And children, for many people–heterosexual and homosexual alike–exist for the same reason: to reflect on Me! and how they make Me! feel.

The State will soon issue each of us a reflecting pool in which we can gaze at ourselves to our heart's content while everything crumbles around us, unheeded.

(Yes, infertile unions are still valid civil marriages because they bear the potential and the meaning of childbearing. It's a complicated philosophical thought. Just turn on MSNBC and don't worry about it.)

Let’s also heap scorn on Justice Kennedy's purple prose at the end of his majority opinion: "Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness." Yep, that's right. Suddenly the US Constitution's job is to ensure that people aren't lonely.

It's not the Nanny State. It's the Yenta State, validating your love and making sure you aren't lonely.

By the way, I wonder how all those happily single people feel about being "condemned to live in loneliness."

Finally, a few quick thoughts:

  1. It’s time for the Church to get out of the civil marriage business. See the Justice of the Peace to get the legal document, then go to the church for the sacrament.
  2. Homosexuals make up less than 3% of the population of the US. It’s not going to be a large number of marriages. But be prepared for advertisers and Hollywood to have them show up everywhere.
  3. We lost this battle when no-fault divorce was legalized and with the acceptance “sweet mystery of life” clause (so-dubbed by Justice Antonin Scalia) in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, not coincidentally also written by Kennedy: “At the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life.” By that way of thinking, anything at all is permissible.

Knight Club

Were I a younger man and relatively fit and healthy, this is something I would be interested in doing. There is a Knights Hall in Nashua, NH, a gym decked out for medieval martial arts, including armored combat, and they call their workouts KnightFit.

Their sport, armored medieval combat, is no Renaissance fair, live-action role play. It also puts to lie the battles one sees on “Game of Thrones” and the “Lord of the Rings” movies, in which lithesome swordsmen twirl their weapons like batons, dancing and slashing with choreographed precision as they cut apart less-skilled opponents and dodge the strikes of more accomplished foes.

The weapons the combatants of The Knights Hall wield are real, carefully crafted to replicate the arming swords, axes, dussacks, falchions and faussarts wielded by knights of the late Middle Ages. Though dulled to prevent bloodshed, the swords and axes can lop off unprotected limbs if swung with enough force, and produce sparks when they strike cold steel.

Life in the “Danger Zone”

Anyone who knows me knows that my early life was defined by a desire to be a naval aviator and astronaut. Top Gun came out in theaters in my senior year of high school. So reading this description of life on board the USS Harry S Truman as it combats ISIS is a great moment of reflection for me. And sobering to realize that even I’d become a Navy pilot, I’d almost certainly be retired from the Navy by now.

While wandering the Truman, seeing so many young people hanging out in small groups, it sometimes seems a bit like high school. People move through hallways, meet up with friends at the lunchroom and respect a fierce hierarchy. Though there aren’t many classrooms on board, there are people studying in all the relatively quiet corners of the ship, preparing for exams that will help them net promotions. The first people I saw on board – waiting in the ATO shack, fresh off of their flight to the ship – were implausibly young-looking Americans in civilian clothes. I actually asked an officer standing nearby why there were young family members on board. He chuckled and informed me that these were new sailors just beginning their service on the Truman. They were under orders to wear civilian clothes while traveling to the Middle East.

The Necessity of Religious Freedom to Democracy

Clay Christensen relates that for democracy to work, most of the people most of the time must voluntarily choose to obey the laws. And historically Americans have chosen to follows the laws because they believed they were accountable not just to society, but to God. As we move further and further away from being a society that believes in God or even one that protects the right to believe in God, the rule of law will continue to break down.

If you want to truly fix all those outrages you read about on Facebook and Twitter every day, stop asking politicians to create new laws that fewer people are choosing to follow. Start demanding the restoration of our religious freedom. And start evangelizing and supporting evangelization efforts.

Ensure you get Airport Base Station updates

If you use an Apple Airport base station for your wireless network, be sure you have the Airport Utility app set to give you notice of updates. These are critical security updates and you want to install them as soon as they are available.

You can do this by opening Airport Utility and then Preferences. Ensure that all the boxes are checked, and that the check is set to Daily for maximum protection or Weekly otherwise.

See 9to5Mac.com for more details.

Next Page →