China planting Trojan horses in US electronics?

China planting Trojan horses in US electronics?

Computer security experts warn that a very sophisticated computer virus originating in China has been found in US consumer electronics, including some digital photo frames sold during Christmas.

     

An insidious computer virus recently discovered on digital photo frames has been identified as a powerful new Trojan Horse from China that collects passwords for online games – and its designers might have larger targets in mind. “It is a nasty worm that has a great deal of intelligence,” said Brian Grayek, who heads product development at Computer Associates, a security vendor that analyzed the Trojan Horse.

 

They say it’s particularly nasty because it hides so effectively from anti-virus software. In fact, the researchers say that this is no “script kiddie” exploit, but a very professional piece of engineering.

So who is behind this? I have to wonder whether it’s the Communist government. Did you know that back in the early 90s, the CIA implanted a virus in a computer printer that was sold to Saddam Hussein’s military in Iraq that when activated took down a major portion of their anti-aircraft defense system?

What if, during the Cold War, the Soviet Union had been our major source of consumer goods. Do you think they would have hesitated for a moment to leverage that advantage? Well, we’ve given China that advantage.

I doubt the Pentagon is sourcing laser printers from China, but it’s not beyond the realm of possibility that a hostile government would want to lay the groundwork for communications and economic chaos in the US, should that become necessary. And don’t doubt for a moment that the People’s Republic of China and its People’s Army see the US as its enemy, regardless of how we view them.

Consider for a moment how much of all the electronics you own are made in mainland China. That new iPhone? China. Lenovo notebook computers are Chinese. Computers, printers, automotive electronics, cameras, iPods, and, yes, digital photo frames, among scores of other products.

Now think about this: What if, during the Cold War, the Soviet Union had been our major source of consumer goods. Do you think they would have hesitated for a moment to leverage that advantage? When Carter cut wheat shipments in response to the invasion of Afghanistan, do you doubt that the Politburo would have considered activating its secret weapon? Well, we’ve given China that advantage. Perhaps this virus is the first glimpse of the result of that decision. Something to think about.

 

Written by
Domenico Bettinelli

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