Care to comment?

Care to comment?

I just got a call form Alan Cooperman of the Washington Post who is doing a story on the announcement about Cardinal McCarrick. He said that Phil Lawler and I haven’t been shy about going out on a limb being critical of bishops in the past so he was looking for us to do so again. Off the record, I told him that I’m new in this job and I’d rather not get labeled as a right-wing nutjob on my first day.

But I did say that I think Cardinal McCarrick’s resignation should have been accepted, that he comes from a generation of bishops that is passing away, and that I think a bishop from the new generation should be installed in Washington, especially to deal with the thorny political issues that creep up in that see and have an impact across the nation. I told him that the previous generation is not delineated by liberal v. conservative, but by an approach to the Church’s teaching that is timorous, that is more worried about offending people and not being welcoming than it is about teaching the truth, unvarnished and strong.

I’ll be curious to see what the result of this phone conversation will be. Will what I said come across in the spirit that I said it or will I come across as a right-wing nutjob? Watch tomorrow’s Washington Post.

Written by
Domenico Bettinelli
6 comments
  • Dom did your record the conversation, have it witnessed and place a copy with your attorney LOL!??

  • I’m sure you can trust the Post completely.

    Did you quote the poet Burns, re the wee, sleekit, cow’rin tim’rous beastie?  Now THAT would have been quoted verbatim smile

  • The older generation is so puzzled that younger Catholics don’t get what was so wonderfully unique about Vatican 2.  Those of us who went through the post Vatican 2 days remember CCD classes completely dominated with pictures of flowers, hearts, and LUV.

  • I just read the article – you don’t sound like a nutjob. He actually seemed to quote you somewhat accurately. I’m sure that reporter will be fired.

Archives

Categories

Categories